Category Archives: Digital

Styling better creative briefs


We all dream of writing that brief which makes a creative team sit up and say “My god! This is it, I get it, I love it, I love you, I know exactly what I am going to do!”

Unfortunately that’s more the exception than the rule and the situation is made worse by the fact that planners/strategists/”thought ninjas” (or whatever other name by which you like to be known – polite only) are primarily verbal people.

Why does that make it worse?

Because most of the time we are talking to primarily visual people. If you put a 3 page A4 document in front of a designer it’s not likely to be viewed as a brilliantly incisive piece of valuable thinking. It’s more likely to be seen as a boring tract of unnecessary detail or, in the worst case scenario, a sleep aid.

There is science behind this of course – research into learning styles. There are 4 key learning styles –

  • Aural or Auditory – learners who like to discuss, listen, repeat and debate in order to learn.
  • Visual – learners who grasp ideas more easily if they are illustrated, graphically represented or arranged for instance by using charts and mind maps.
  • Visual (verbal) – learners who take in information through words read/write
  • Kinesthetic – learners who need their learning to be connected to reality through demonstrations, exhibits, case studies etc.

Too often we’re guilty of  putting out briefs and information in ways that are unusable or difficult for others to process, and then we wonder why our carefully crafted masterpieces get ignored.

How to combat this?

  1. Write less – please can we have no more 3 page A4 tomes as briefs. Even I can’t bear them and I love writing (viz and towhit…)
  2. Include imagery – Combine the fundamental  requirements and insights with one picture that expresses the whole concept
  3. Think about immersion – Can we use physical space to brief, experiences to drive understanding?

We now use a brief that has a full page image and 2 pages of ppt size and I’ve found it to be really useful in helping me communicate both fact and emotional concepts. I haven’t yet had an occasion on which to use a Kinesthetic approach but would love to hear from anyone who has on what worked and what didn’t.

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CES Trends 2018 – Tech and Experiential


It’s a busy time of year at Imagination. We cover SEMA, LA Autoshow, CES and Detroit in 3 short months. The good thing about that is there is a lot to digest and explore and some interesting things to bend your mind around from what the B2B experiential landscape looks like to where technology trends are going in the next 12 months.

Here’s my report from CES  which picks up on some of the trends we were seeing in our Experiential Trends report and identifies a couple of themes from the tech world that we will definitely be using in our future autoshow program.

You can download the paper here…

Imag_CES-Trends-01162018

Best Use of AR – Event Tech Gold Award


I’ve said before I love working with the creatives in Imagination, nothing is impossible to them. Plus we get to work with incredible partners such as Unreal, Kitestring and NCAM. And here’s another example – a world first use of AR at the Detroit autoshow to tell stories about Ford’s cars when people can’t actually see inside them.

We just won a Gold award for this work in the Event Tech awards.

AI and experiential


A shot of drawings from Quick,Draw!AI has made it’s way into our lives without us really noticing.

The ads that recommend products you might like? Machine learning.

Siri, Alexa? They use AI to develop ever better wake-word detection (the words that wake them up and start them listening) and speech recognition.

And of course the ever popular Quick, Draw!

But working out how AI might impact on our own work lives is of course way more interesting. For instance, what will AI do to the world of experiential design?

Threats
The demise of the middle classes is the very latest apocalpyse promised by technology. But the threat is real. AIs work faster and can be more accurate than us, picking up nuances that humans miss. Examples?

  • We know that AI can plan moves to outwit a GO! master. So AI could plan the optimum path or paths through experiences. That would do away with the need for architectural design experts.
  • AI can analyze big data and derive insights in such a way that there may be no perceived need for strategists, particularly if the strategists have focused their attention solely on data and measurement rather than emotional connection and behavioral economics
  • AI can assess creative outputs and recommend universally appealing stories or interactions that deliver much of the work of human creatives, faster and more efficiently, and possibly even more effectively. IBM Watson was asked to make recommendations for a film trailer of the film Morgan. Check out the rather unsettling results. 

But as with every threat the flip side is the opportunity.

Opportunities
From the research I am currently reading and the pilot projects we are working on at Imagination I can see some interesting opportunities for experiential design agencies that hinge on doing at a more intricate level what we should always be doing – making more effective, emotionally affective experiences for our audiences.

  • AI can deliver a new way of measuring volume and behavior inside experiences that gives new levels of detail. Instead of self-reported research responses which are always biased we can map experiential user journeys more accurately. As one example, we can look at whether people really ended up where we wanted them because they were attracted there, or driven there.
  • Facial mapping technology can help us determine high and low value experiences much faster than we have been able to do previously. This opens the possibility of more adaptive experiential spaces – screens that change content responsively, according to what most people in the space want, or to create shock and excitement with content that no one is expecting?
  • Speech enabled environments that can deliver personally crafted stories from a huge data set, via your mobile, on the fly. Imagine that for museums.
  • Identifying the places and moments inside an experience that require more human interaction.

Currently AI needs human input to be of value. Maybe it will reach a point where it doesn’t need human input.

But one interesting observation from game 4 of the 5 game match between AlphaGol and Lee Sedol.

The moment where the program made it’s fateful mistake in that match was the moment that Lee Sedol made an unexpected and unpredictable move.  We love to believe that humans are rational, predictable and definable. But if behavioral economics has taught us anything it’s that we are more emotional or ‘irrational’ than we like to believe. That’s where AI has problems. But that’s where experiences truly bring value to the marketing mix.

We are, after all, animals that thrive off emotional connection, so much so that it actually creates health in us.  So experiential designers should consider ways to work with AI as a way of generating more of that irrationality that seems to be a characteristic of humans to deliver emotions that drive brand energy.

SXSW 17 Part 2 – Tech Trends


This is the second of two posts about SXSW. The previous one looked at the experiential trends, you can read it here.  This post is focused on the key tech trends.  And there are 3 topics that kept coming up time and again:-

  • the implications of cars that can store and process information within the IoT,
  • the possibilities and the possible horrors of robot takeover
  • and VR’s move from fad to function.
Nio EP9 autonomous race car
Nio EP9 – autonomous race car, proved out on Californian test track. Beautiful!

Trend 1 – Smart cities, autonomous cars

Imagine driving to work and catching up on your latest book, or if you have kids catching up on sleep! And the ride is smooth, because there’s no stop/start, no congestion, instead you arrive on time, because the city you are driving through is smart and is managing the traffic.

Beyond that, you might have been slowed down at any point to avoid skidding on wet roads because other cars have been sending micro-weather reports to the Federal Government or to the Met Office.

Great, right? But cities and cars and governments are directly in relationship. And that relationship is raising questions.

For instance, if your car can send micro-reports about weather, it can send reports about how your car is driving. Or is that about how you are driving? And what does that mean for your privacy?

And how do you manage relationships between cars that are driving together on the same road? Do you trust them to give you the right information?

And what if a criminal decides to hack the stop signs that talk to your car and regulate city traffic stopping you from getting to vote?

What’s driving all this? IoT is established and becoming embedded in our environments way beyond tools like Nest. Manufacturers are pushing ahead, investing in AI and testing and selling autonomous vehicles. Cities see all kinds of benefits in cost reduction via things like lighting management and congestion or pollution management and government is playing catch up on policy and regulation.

No one had all the answers but the interest was intense.

Trend 2 – AI/Robot takeover

When you consider that Ford has just announced a $1bn investment in AI over the next 5 years and hotel chains like Crowne Plaza are testing a delivery robot you can see the AI and robotic services are a mainstream proposition.

There were 2 different strands to the discussion. The first was largely positive:

  • Amazon delivery drones on the street
  • Bill Ford talking about drones being released from F150s for search and delivery
  • Discussion of how to create sound for robots
  • A plea for school kids to be taught how to develop AI so that they will be able to come and study it and improve at a later date (Carnegie Mellon)
  • Conversations with robots in the Japan House

The second was way more cautious, almost fearful:

  • There are 2 other things we do not currently teach those developing AI systems – Ethics and Problem Solving. Yet they are essential to developing AI responsibly.
  • Implications of robotics and AI for the workforce are that ‘47% of total US employment is in the high-risk category, meaning that associated occupations are potentially automatable over…the [next] decade or two’ Fray and Osborne 2017
  • Likely to hit service and white collar workers – how do we conceive of what it means to be employed, have a job, to have self-respect and self-value etc?
  • The scenario that arises when an autonomous car has to choose between the safety of a crowd and the safety of its passengers
The definition of me according to IBM’s Watson.

There were some great installations to explore the possibilities. IBM was there in force demonstrating the abilities of its Watson AI. I got a very wearable t-shirt based on a ‘conversation’ with Watson. There was also a system for monitoring the homes of the elderly so that they can live more independently. There was also an application that used AI to create new music based on your choice of mood or mix of styles.

There were also some ‘realistic’ robots you could have a conversation with, sort of and some creative projects exploring the use of  AI in product design.

Undoubtedly the rise of robots is going to change our world. The creative classes and white collar workers have been safely  insulated from the drive to automation that has decimated the blue collar workforce.  The drive at SXSW was around both how that is managed and how we push towards a positive future.

Trend 3 – VR/AR/MR

It’s the cool new kid on the block and last year it was a strong emerging strand. But this year there was a whole room dedicated to VR experiences.Someone described it to me as VR finding it’s level, beginning to move from fad to function.

Many different players were there from NASA to Creative Industries Funding NL showcasing pro-social, creative and art projects in VR.  There were also art installations in conjunction with for example the New Museum in New York using VR to immerse you in a different cultural experience.

And there was a lot of discussion about how it can work best. For instance, VR can be an isolating medium and we are innately social animals, so how can we best create social experiences with VR? Sony’s WoW Factory had a game played alongside/against 3 other players including motion, wind and digital interaction in the space. It was great fun and engaging to watch as well as play.

The key driver this year was the way that we may start to integrate technology into our lives far beyond looking at a screen. It is moving into a space where our life and our technology are almost inseparable. There are ethical and emotional consequences for that, but the SXSW crowd will certainly be there to explore and expose those way before the rest of us. That’s a comforting thought.

 

SXSW 17 Part 1 – Top 3 Experience Trends


How much do you notice your environment? As a strategist at an experiential agency visiting a conference like SXSW is a busman’s holiday for me.  Alongside all the talks and tech trends I am constantly observing experiential trends. This post is part 1 of a two part post on my experiences at SXSW 2017. Part 2 will focus on Top 3 Tech Trends at the conference.

Trend 1 – Colour me happy

Last year there was a strong trend for natural textures combined with high tech elements that were very often silvery or metallic. This year the naturals are still there but there was more colour everywhere. From post-it notes to displays, from lampshades to billiard tables brands were activating spaces with more attention to diverse colour palettes.

A great example was the Sony experience. The whole space was an owned temporary structure, designed to showcase tech.  The build was very functional – lots of chip board and exposed scaffold. However, via clever use of coloured decals across dividing walls they brought a more structured and warm feeling to the space.

Great British House is another interesting example, coming from a different place. The UKDTI took over a bar called the Speakeasy on Congress and so they had to work within an existing aesthetic. The overall feeling was dark and traditional with lots of natural wood. So it was individual elements which lifted the space such as bright neon lights and  spray painted lampshades in red,white and blue. The billiard table took the flag theme, and the walls were lifted with colourful participatory post-it notes.

The effect is informal, warm and unpretentious. It’s a development of the appeal to Millennials who love authenticity and the idea of being involved with brands at a more fundamental level.

Trend 2 – Keep it simple 
If I asked you to predict future trends for next year how long would it take to answer? How much space would you need? What if I asked you how a brand experience made you feel? Most people find it easier to share short form emotional responses than dig deep into information and opinion. Trend 2 centred around finding creative ways to engage users directly, using analogue mediums. Post-it notes, flower markers in sand pits, writing directly onto walls and so on appeared in spaces as diverse as IBM, Dell and Fast Company.

The sense of something being crafted by a group, something less digital being therefore more personal seems to be what is driving this. The question stimulus was always around memory and  emotion. That’s  partly because it is much easier to respond to this than to have to give an expert opinion. But it’s also because it creates an emotional connection that drives a memory and above all brands at SXSW need to create a memory of relevance and modernity.

As a whole there was a sense of simplicity and analogue engagement across brand spaces which emerged out of these types of installation.

Trend 3 – Personalize
What do you take home from every conference? Swag! SXSW is no different. I got some very nice CNN shades for instance. But the main problem with swag is that it ends usually ends up in the bin or at the gym – or maybe on your kids. It’s not valued or valuable. This year brands addressed that by looking at ways to make their swag work harder through personal relevance.

Let’s start with IBM. Watson is an AI product IBM are pushing hard. It is an artificial intelligence combining data analysis with intelligent outputs to help with almost anything you can image. The IBM house this year was packed with partnerships from music creation software to home safety monitoring for the elderly and weather pattern analysis. This year’s swag was, like last year’s a t-shirt. Unlike last year’s this year’s had personal relevance, a pattern that expressed your personality as determined by Watson. After answering some questions the engine buckets you into one of 5 types I was a Mentor (most people at the conference were Mavericks or Dynamos with Mentors coming a close 3rd). As a result  of engaging with Watson and IBM I have a t-shirt that is both meaningful and attractive. I might actually wear it outside the gym!

Less attractive but no less personally meaningful is this digital give aways from Great British House. A  dress-up booth and some props combined with some fools produced the masterpiece you see here. A digital memento that I treasure…

Similar things were happening at CNN which took pics of you on a swing and created a gif in much the same way. And at Fast Company Ford were offering a digital selfie that showed you what an autonomous car sees when it sees you.

These gizzits are personal, more relevant than a key ring or waterbottle and of course fittingly digital.

Next week – Trends in tech

Detroit vs tech start-ups?


I am off to SXSW on Thursday and I will be writing a couple of reports out during the conference – plus lots of tweeting/facebook updates I expect. Just so you know!

I will also be uploading more light-hearted content to instagram.com/imaginationdet.

Then, on Monday, I will be speaking with some colleagues about Detroit as a hot bed for tech start ups. We use interesting start-ups from all over for the ideas and creativity they bring to our strategy and concepting. The guys we have asked to join us are really great and have lots to share about how they connect to start up culture, being start ups themselves and what a fertile environment Detroit is for start-up culture in general.  They are Kurt Steckling of  Vectorform who are very well established and also promote start-up culture and Ian Sigmon of Gunner, an animation studio who have been running for just under 2 years in Detroit.

It should be fun and hopefully my updates will be useful and interesting for you.